Results tagged ‘ Rookie of the Year ’

Jeter making more history

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

8-20-09-Carr_AparicioJeter.jpgWith an RBI double in the third inning of Sunday’s game against the Mariners, Derek Jeter passed Hall of Famer Luis Aparicio for the most hits by a shortstop. And at just 35 years old, Jeter is far from finished.

“I think I have a few more hits left in me,” Jeter said.

Through Wednesday’s game, Jeter needs only 25 hits in the Yankees’ last 41 contests to pass Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig and become the Yankees’ all-time hit leader. He already holds the Yankees record for career singles.

Offensively, Jeter’s numbers are similar to many Hall of Fame shortstops, including Cal Ripken Jr. The numbers below reflect games played at shortstop:

8-20-09-Carr_RipkenJeterChart.jpgLuke Appling and Joe Cronin, two other Hall of Fame shortstops who played almost all of their games at short, had similar career numbers to that of Ripken and Jeter. Here are their career lines, counting games they played at other positions:

 
8-20-09-Carr_ApplingCroninChart.jpg
8-20-09-Carr_ApplingCroninRipken.jpgJeter has won three Gold Glove Awards, two Silver Slugger Awards and the 1996 AL Rookie of the Year Award. In 2000, he was the MVP of the All-Star Game and the World Series. He has four World Series rings and has been named to nine All-Star Games, including starting the 2008 game at Yankee Stadium. In 2003, he was named the 11th Yankee captain.

Like all these players, Jeter has shown one attribute in his career that has allowed him to put up impressive offensive numbers – consistency.

“I think being consistent is something that gets overlooked at times, but I think every player strives to be consistent,” Jeter said. “That’s all you can do.”

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Former Atlanta Brave Brian Hunter gets his turn in Cooperstown

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

Brian Hunter peered into the Braves’ locker in the Hall of Fame’s Today’s Game exhibit and stared right into history.

“Look, Smoltzie’s shoes,” said Hunter of the cleats belonging to former Braves teammate John Smoltz. “And there’s (a photo of Rafael) Furcal. And Andruw Jones’ bat. I was there with all of them.”

8-17-09-Carr_Hunter.jpgHunter was more than “there.” The nine-year major league vet, who spent parts of five seasons with the Braves, appeared in three World Series with Atlanta and played a role in the Braves’ remarkable run through the 1990s.

Hunter toured the Hall of Fame on Monday as part of a team from the Cooperstown All Star Village. Hunter, along with former Minnesota Twins farmhand Vern Hildebrandt, serve as coaches for the team.

Hunter, now 41 but still looking every bit the athlete, broke into the majors in 1991 and finished fourth in the National League Rookie of the Year voting, He hit .333 in the Braves’ win over Pittsburgh in the NLCS, then scored two runs and drove in three more while playing in all seven games of the World Series. Hunter appeared in the 1992 World Series with Atlanta, then — after being traded to Pittsburgh in following the 1993 season — wrapped up his big league career with stints with the Pirates, Reds, Mariners, Cardinals, Braves (again) and the Phillies.

It was Hunter’s first trip to the Hall of Fame, but — on paper — he’s been here since his big league debut in 1991. Hunter, just like every one of the 17,000-plus men who have played Major League Baseball, has a file in the Hall of Fame’s Library. When shown a file story recounting Hunter’s brush with a beanball, his youth baseball team let out a big “Ooohhhh.”

“This is amazing,” said Hunter while poring over a few of the three million documents in the Hall of Fame’s Library. “It’s all here.”

Craig Muder is the director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Baseball Film Festival Returns this October

Light_90.jpgBy Stephen Light

“Remember kid, there’s heroes and there’s legends. Heroes get remembered but legends never die; follow your heart kid, and you’ll never go wrong.”

The Babe gave this advice to young Benjamin Franklin Rodriguez, who was trying to help his friend Scotty Smalls out of a big pickle after losing his step father’s autographed Ruth ball. The Sandlot easily ranks among my top baseball movies of all time, but what are yours?

7-9-09-Light_FilmFestival.jpgAs manager of museum programs here at the National Baseball Hall of Fame, I have some pretty unique opportunities from time to time. But one of my favorite events is our annual Baseball Film Festival, held each fall. The action and suspense of the game have always translated well on the big screen. Think of the list: Bull Durham, Field of Dreams, The Natural, Major League, Pride of the Yankees, Rookie of the Year and I could keep going.

The diversity of entries at our annual film festival makes this event so unique. Take, for example, the 2008 Film Festival: The Best Film Award went to Dreaming in Blue (Fuera de Liga), a documentary on the Cuban team Industriales; The Award for Baseball Excellence went to a film focused on the game’s English origins entitled Base Ball Discovered; and the Award for Filmmaking Excellence went to a humorous short film entitled Gandhi at the Bat, a fictitious account of Gandhi’s one and only plate appearance at Yankee Stadium.

7-9-09-Light_Awards.jpgIn addition to these excellent films, we screened a film about Dummy Hoy, the first successful deaf major leaguer, as well as parts of a miniseries about the New England Collegiate Baseball League. We even had a documentary called Cobb Field: A Day at the Ballpark, which brought to life a full day at the Billings Mustangs old ballpark.

This year’s festival will take place October 2-4, and we recently started accepting submissions. Who knows what great movies are in store?

To be considered for entry into the festival, films must have been released in the last five years and baseball must be a primary or secondary theme of the film. Films may be of any length and genre. If you have a film that meets these criteria, or you know of someone who does, all you need to do to submit your film for consideration is mail two copies to the following address (along with any promotional materials you may have):

Manager of Museum Programs
25 Main Street
Cooperstown, NY 13326

If, like me, you just enjoy watching baseball films, be sure to mark down October 2-4 on your calendar. Tickets to the screenings of each film are free (with the price of Museum admission), and with the fall colors and crisp air, it’s a great time to be in Cooperstown.

Check out these trailers from last year’s films:
Base Ball Discovered
Cobb Field: A Minor League Day at the Ballpark
Dummy Hoy: A Deaf Hero
Eye on the Dream
Gandhi at the Bat
Mathematically Alive: A Story of Fandom

Stephen Light is manager of museum programs at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

7-9-09-Light_FilmFlyer.jpg

Future Iron Man in Cooperstown

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

Dick and Mary Lue Brown didn’t expect to see anyone famous when they entered the Museum on a summer morning in 1983. They had traveled from their home in Portland, Mich., to Cooperstown for the Hall of Fame Game between the Orioles and Cardinals with their four young sons.

But Dick Brown recognized a star in the Museum, walking around quietly by himself, just taking in the history.

3-26-09-Carr_Ripken.jpg“It was 9:30 in the morning and there was Cal Ripken, holding a bottle of Coke, cordial as all get out,” Brown said. “This was before he knew he would be a Hall of Famer.”

The 22-year-old Ripken was still fairly unknown, despite having won the American League Rookie of the Year Award the previous season. Brown asked if he could take a picture, and Ripken happily agreed.

Ripken singled in the game that weekend, although the Orioles lost, 4-1. The team went on to win the World Series, and Ripken won his first American League Most Valuable Player Award.

Brown told his wife, “If he ever gets into the Hall, I want to be there.”

So, return they did in 2007 with the 1983 photo and a record crowd to see Ripken and Tony Gwynn inducted into the Hall of Fame. Friends who own a bed-and-breakfast in town told the Browns to donate their photo to the Hall’s collection. They made a few copies for themselves, and the Hall of Fame gladly accepted the donation.

The Browns even had a chance to meet Ripken’s brother Billy that weekend. They wanted to give a copy of the photo to the family, and Billy Ripken took down their name and address. A few weeks later, the photo came back in the mail, autographed by Cal Ripken himself.

“On the photo was written, ‘Looks like we’ve come full circle.’ This is such a great memory, and Cal has been such a wonderful ambassador to baseball,” Brown said.

The Browns returned to Cooperstown on Monday, March 23, and got to peek at the file containing the Hall of Fame’s photos of Ripken.

“There are some wonderful photos in there, taken by professional photographers,” Brown said. “To see our photo among them, taken by an average Joe with an Instamatic camera, is pretty special.”

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Hargrove slips in and out of Museum

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

Mike Hargrove spent his entire baseball career behind the scenes.

So when he made a trip to the Baseball Hall of Fame in September, it was no surprise that it came without fanfare. But this time, “behind the scenes” also meant a look at baseball’s most sacred treasures.

Hargrove stopped in Cooperstown on Sept. 19 while on a trip through the Northeast. He and his wife, Sharon, travel throughout the country on their motorcycle, and few heads turned as the couple pulled into Cooper Park next door to the Hall of Fame.

9-22-08-Muder_Hargrove.jpgOnce inside, the Hargroves received a behind-the-scenes tour from Senior Curator Tom Shieber and chatted with Bull Durham writer/director Ron Shelton, who was himself experiencing the thrill of looking at the Museum’s archives.

A few hours later, the Hargroves emerged from the Hall of Fame and walked down Main Street to have a relaxed lunch. Soon after, they returned to Cooper Park, put on their leathers and rolled north on Main Street and out of town.

It was typical of Hargrove, who never sought the spotlight as a player or manager. A former Rookie of the Year and All-Star with the Texas Rangers, Hargrove was famous for his deliberate — or was that super-slow motion? — approach at the plate. And yet those tactics, which drove pitchers crazy and got them off their rhythm, often overshadowed a hitter who compiled a .290 career average and a .396 on-base percentage.

As a manager, Hargrove took over a dilapidated Cleveland Indians franchise in 1991 and led it to the World Series four years later. His even-handed approach and clubhouse skills resulted in five playoff appearances and two American League pennants for a team that was the laughingstock of baseball in the 1970s and ’80s.

At 58, Hargrove certainly has something left to give as a manager. Yet it would shock no one if he spent the rest of his days enjoying the fruits of his former lifetime. After a career in forced limelight, Hargrove seems content with his life.

Baseball is better because of people like him.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 58 other followers