Results tagged ‘ Peter Ueberroth ’

Learning from the pros

By Craig Muder

For the Class of 2011 at the Frank and Peggy Steele Internship Program, the Baseball Hall of Fame will mark the start of their professional careers.

But – as author Kenneth Shropshire demonstrated Wednesday during an intern seminar – their career paths promise to be filled with more adventure than they could ever imagine.

Shropshire, a professor at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, shared his career story during a Sports Business seminar as part of the Steele Internship summer lineup. A graduate of Stanford University and Columbia Law School, Shropshire turned to sports law after a football career at Stanford. He later worked at a firm that handled projects for the Los Angeles Lakers and former Dodgers All-Star first baseman Steve Garvey.

“I thought I was headed toward being a sports agent, negotiating contracts for my friends who made it to the NFL and in other pro sports,” Shropshire said. “But eventually I took a job with the Los Angeles Olympic Committee, and I was put in charge of boxing by the head of the Committee, Peter Ueberroth.”

Ueberroth, who later became the Commissioner of Baseball, recognized Shropshire’s talent quickly. Shropshire, in turn, hired Harvey Schiller as the competition director for boxing. Schiller is now a member of the Board of Directors at the Baseball Hall of Fame.

“That was Harvey’s first job in sports business,” Shropshire said. “It shows that if you hire the right people and let them do their job, they can make you look very good.”

Wednesday’s program was one of many for the 20 interns in the Class of 2011 at the Hall of Fame – all of which are interspersed with their daily duties in one of more than a dozen departments.

The Steele Internship Program at the Hall of Fame is held over 10 weeks every summer, and applications for the Class of 2012 will be accepted this fall. For more information, click here.

Craig Muder is the director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Breaking barriers

Francis_90.jpgBy Bill Francis

Claire Smith is accustomed to working outside the status quo, so being the first female keynote speaker in the 22 years of the annual Cooperstown Symposium on Baseball and American Culture is par for the course.

Held at the different venues at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, the three-day event kicked off Wednesday afternoon with Smith’s keynote, titled “Race and Gender: Perspectives from the Press Box.” Smith is not only a female in a male- dominated field, but she’s also African-American.

06-02-10-Francis_Smith.jpgCurrently a news editor at ESPN who covered baseball for 27 years at the Hartford Courant, the New York Times and the Philadelphia Inquirer, Smith offered a unique perspective on the trails and tribulations she had to endure as a woman and a minority in her chosen field.

Honored for her writing numerous times over the years, Smith, a longstanding member of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America, admits that “being a woman and being African-American in the field of baseball writing remain somewhat unique and far too unusual in this day and age.”

Smith talked about being drawn to the field because of her mother’s love of Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson, who faced hardships as he crossed the big league color line in 1947.

“I knew of his story from the moment I could walk and talk, I think, because my mother, more so than my father, was a Jackie Robinson fan,” Smith said. “America was always represented as what is possible. She passed that on to me.

“I wanted to know as much as I could about sports. The older I got the more I wanted to know. I was able to dovetail this interest that never made me want to think about anything other than baseball.”

Smith would late joke about another Hall of Famer: “As Yogi Berra would say, Jackie (Robinson) -  thanks for making this necessary.”

Encouraged by her mother’s love of Jackie Robinson (her father was a Willie Mays fan), Smith has always bled Dodger blue. So it should come as no surprise when visiting the Hall of Fame Plaque Gallery prior to her speech she made sure to check out the bronze likenesses of Robinson and Sandy Koufax.

Moving on to gender, Smith said that’s always been the more intriguing and difficult aspect of her life in baseball.

“It’s safe to say by the time I started covering baseball it wasn’t politically correct to show any kind of prejudice in terms of race in major league clubhouses,’ Smith said. “Not so much to show prejudice against women. It happened early, it happened often.”

Often the only women in a baseball clubhouse, Smith called it “tough, it really was tough.”

“I don’t believe there is a female writer of my generation who didn’t have a tale to tell that wouldn’t bring another female writer to tears because it was a very vulnerable place to be,” Smith added. “And often your male peers were so busy doing their job that they couldn’t interrupt their jobs and come to your aid.”

Smith then recalled her defining moment, her “tipping point,” came in the 1984 National League Championship Series between the Chicago Cubs and San Diego Padres when she was physically removed by players from the Padres clubhouse after Game One. While the situation was eventually resolved, thanks to Baseball Commissioner Peter Ueberroth, it left scars for a number of years.

But despite the hardships Smith suffered due only to the profession she chose, she told those in attendance to encourage their students, daughters, nieces and granddaughters to pursue sports writing as a career. Not only are there numerous opportunities with the Internet, but also it can be a very rewarding.

Bill Francis is a library associate for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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