Results tagged ‘ Mike Piazza ’

Cooperstown credentials

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

When all-time saves king Trevor Hoffman announced his retirement on Wednesday, it marked the end of a brilliant career.

It also started the clock running on his Hall of Fame candidacy, which is scheduled to begin in 2016.

01-12-11-Muder_Hoffman.jpgIt seems like a long time from now. But by the time we reach fifth United States presidential election of the new millennium, the Hall of Fame may be in the midst of a historic run of inductees.

Since the Baseball Writers’ Association of America began electing Hall of Fame candidates in 1936, 44 players have won election in their first year of eligibility. This includes the first five of Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth and Honus Wagner in 1936, but does not represent the elections of Lou Gehrig (elected by acclimation) in 1939 or Roberto Clemente (elected by special election) in 1973.

Starting in 1936, the BBWAA has conducted 68 Hall of Fame elections. And only once – 1989-90 – have at least two first-ballot candidates been elected in back-to-back years. Those elections featured Johnny Bench and Carl Yastrzemski in 1989, followed by Joe Morgan and Jim Palmer in 1990.

But beginning in 2013, the BBWAA could easily select multiple first-ballot candidates in four straight elections.

Two years from now, the Hall of Fame ballot will feature players like Craig Biggio, Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens, Mike Piazza and Curt Schilling for the first time. The following year, in 2014, Tom Glavine, Jeff Kent, Greg Maddux, Mike Mussina and Frank Thomas will debut on the ballot.

01-12-11-Muder_Hoffman2.jpgIn 2015, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez and John Smoltz are all eligible for the first time. And in 2016, Hoffman will join Ken Griffey Jr. on the ballot.

Since the selection of the first class, the 1999 election marked the only time as many as three first-ballot candidates were elected in the same year. In that time, only seven other elections (1962, 1982, 1989, 1990, 2001, 2004, 2007) featured as many as two first-ballot electees.

But with the above list featuring the likes of four 300-game winners, three members of the 500-home run club, a member of the 3,000-hit club and the all-time saves leader, we could see a couple years with three-or-more electees and as many as four years with multiple enshrines.

Predicting the BBWAA vote is never easy. But the talent set to become Hall of Fame-eligible in the next five years in undeniable.

As for 2017 and beyond, consider the likes of Chipper Jones, Mariano Rivera, Ivan Rodriguez, Jim Thome and Omar Vizquel – all of whom are likely to retire in the next few seasons. The streak could easily reach five or six years with multiple first-ballot electees.

Bottom line: Baseball was filled with shining stars in the 1990s and 2000s. And thanks to those players, Cooperstown is going to be one busy place this decade.

Craig Muder is the director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Baseball Credited with the Save

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. – Even during America’s darkest days, baseball provides a little light.

9-11-09-Carr_Seigel.jpgOn Friday, Sept. 11, newlyweds Jason and Jody Seigel visited the Baseball Hall of Fame as part of their honeymoon. The date could not have been more significant for Jason.

During their visit to the Baseball Hall of Fame, the Seigels were wearing shirts to honor victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks.

“We try to wear these shirts once a year on this date to remember what happened on 9-11. For me, it always feels like I got a second chance at life that day. I lost about 23 friends in those attacks,” said Jason.

Back in 2001, Jason was asked to be the best man at a friend’s wedding. He was living in North Carolina at the time, and planned to travel to the New Jersey area for the wedding. As a Mets fan, Seigel thought it would be fun to catch a ballgame with his friend – who is a Phillies fan – as a bachelor party-type celebration of the wedding.

“We decided the two of us would go to the Labor Day game between the Phillies and the Mets (in Philadelphia),” said Seigel.

9-11-09-Carr_Crowd.jpgDespite having seats just a few rows from the third base line, Jason’s friend had to miss the game due to a scheduling conflict.

“So without hesitating, I thought of all the games my dad took me to as a child and decided it was time to pay my dad back with a trip to the ballpark,” said Seigel.

On Sept. 3, 2001, Jason and his dad watched as the Mets beat the Phillies 10-7.

“We had a great day, we spoke to each other as two adults do, talking not only as father and son, but also as two dads. We discussed our jobs, our marriages and we drank in every moment of the close game.”

During the game, Seigel found out from work that he’d be back up north in a week for a business meeting in New York City. His dad suggested instead of making two trips to try and hold the meeting a week early and save himself the time.

“The baseball game we watched had made me feel very close to my dad, and put me back in a place I used to be as a child – taking advice from him as if he could do no wrong by giving it,” said Seigel.

9-11-09-Carr_Piazza.jpgSeigel took the advice and arranged plans with his boss to hold the client meetings the following day – Tuesday, Sept. 4.

“So you see, if I had not gone to the game with my father, and took his advice, I would have been in (World Trade Center) Tower One at 8:30 a.m. on Sept. 11, 2001, and not a week earlier on Sept. 4.”

Jason will never forget how baseball saved his life.

“For me, baseball was always an island of peace when I was growing up. I’d go to the game with my dad and we’d just talk about baseball, not about school or what I might have done wrong that day. Just baseball. It is still an island of peace for me.”

Samantha Carr is media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

A disliked bat destined for greatness

Horn_90.jpgBy Brad Horn

Baseball immortality takes all shapes and forms. And even, it seems, undesirable forms.

Such is the case of the Louisville Slugger that once belonged to Padres center fielder Jody Gerut until he donated it to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum at approximately 10:30 p.m. on Monday night.

Gerut notched not only the first official hit in the history of Citi Field, the Mets’ new showplace just feet from where Shea Stadium once stood, but that game-opening hit on the evening’s third pitch was a home run, adding to the significance of the feat.

After the game, Gerut was all too willing to rid himself of the bat that helped the Padres rain on the Mets’ parade. Walking into the clubhouse with Gerut and Padres shortstop David Eckstein, I told Jody that David could vouch for the care his bat would receive.

4-14-09-Horn_Gerut.jpg“David’s spikes from the ’02 [World] Series are in Cooperstown,” I said.

“Yep,” David added, “And my cap, too.” (The cap coming from his role as the little engine that could in propelling the ’06 Cardinals to a title.)

In having his bat immortalized forever in Cooperstown, Gerut didn’t resist the chance to part with the bat, not trying to milk one or two more clutch hits from this supposed good-luck charm.

“You want this?” Gerut asked me after the game. “Man, this is a lousy bat, go right ahead.”

And with that declaration, Gerut’s bat, along with the ceremonial first-pitch ball thrown by Hall of Famer Tom Seaver and caught by legendary catcher Mike Piazza, and a Dunkin’ Donuts cup full of dirt from home plate taken after the game, are en route to their eternal home in Cooperstown this morning, where fans will soon be able to witness these treasures as part of our Today’s Game exhibit.

For Gerut, despite his displeasure with his bat, the moment means his donation will be forever linked with some of the greatest names of all time. And he’ll have the added satisfaction of being the answer to the trivia question, “Who collected the first hit in Citi Field history?”

The honor of the moment, though, is the lasting lesson from a great night for the gracious Gerut. After I had departed the Padres clubhouse last night, Gerut told my good friend Tim Sullivan, columnist for The San Diego Union-Tribune, “In the end, it is a very humbling experience to have any part of your equipment in the Hall of Fame. That’s special.”

For Jody, being a part of baseball history will be a special moment in his life, as one day he’ll look back at the feat with a sense of pride. Today, he’ll just be happy that the donation means a new bat. One he’ll enjoy more than the one that ended up in Cooperstown.

Brad Horn is the senior director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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