Results tagged ‘ Facebook ’

Baseball Comes to Life

By Samantha Carr

Storytellers.

That is really what baseball broadcasters are. Whether they are giving play-by-play of live game action on the radio or providing commentary about team chemistry on television – they are the voices that bring the game to life.

There are the broadcasters who remind me of childhood – the ones whose voices I never mistake. There are the ones I’ve grown to love, because they bring live action from my favorite team each night.

There are broadcasters who root for the home team, ones who talk about statistics and ones who get emotional when they see a great play. These men and women make the game interesting when you can’t be there in person.

I’ve learned a lot about baseball from broadcasters. You learn nuances of the game that may go unnoticed when taking in the game by yourself. Sometimes commentary even provides insight into players that you wouldn’t know otherwise – like how a pitcher has been working on a new delivery or how teammates got into an argument during batting practice before the game.

Sometimes broadcasters are Hall of Fame ballplayers who spent 20 years in the big leagues and sometimes they are just a sports fan who grew up loving the game.

During his acceptance speech for the 2010 Ford C. Frick Award for excellence in broadcasting, Jon Miller told the story of the moment that changed his life as a kid in Candlestick Park.

“I’m looking into that visiting broadcast booth and right in the middle of an inning there’s a batter at the plate and that broadcaster says, ‘There’s a curve ball, low and outside, Ball 2’,” said Miller. “And then he grabbed a big handful of, I thought it was french fries, and he jammed all these french fries into his mouth and he’s chewing on those fries, and while he’s still chewing the next pitch comes in and he says, without missing a beat, “There’s a fast ball outside, Ball 3.” Then he grabbed a cup full of whatever. He took a big pull on that cup. And as a ten year old I sat there and said, ‘That is the life for me’.”

Throughout the month of September, fans will have a chance to celebrate their favorite broadcasters by voting online to determine three of the ten finalists for the 2012 Ford C. Frick Award. Voting will take place on the Hall of Fame’s Facebook page, from Sept. 1 through Sept. 30.

Seventy-five candidates will appear on the fan ballot – two representing every current big league team and 15 at-large selections. The three highest vote-getters will join seven other candidates as finalists for the Award. Make sure your voice is heard and vote!

Samantha Carr is the manager of web and digital media for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Lucky 10,000

Hayes_90.jpgBy Trevor Hayes

Colby Lessmann became a fan of the Hall of Fame on Facebook last week because he wanted to stay in touch. Little did he know that by clicking the “Become a fan” button on www.facebook.com/baseballhall, he’d be getting more than updates on his News Feed.

04-15-10-Hayes_Kauffman.jpgLessmann just happened to be Facebook fan number 10,000 – a mark the Hall reached in just over a year after launching on Opening Day 2009. To honor him, the Hall of Fame has given away an individual membership. As a Member, Lessmann receives a subscription to the Hall’s bi-monthly Memories and Dreams magazine, a Hall of Fame Yearbook, complimentary admission, a Tom Seaver membership card and lapel pin and a 10 percent discount and free shipping on all purchases through the Hall of Fame store at www.baseballhall.org/shop.

A baseball-lifer, Lessmann has been a fan since his early childhood, continuing to play the game through college and now as an amateur at age 37. He grew up four hours north of Kansas City and watched the glory years of the Royals, led by Hall of Famer George Brett. Many of Brett’s heroic feats serve as Lessmann’s greatest baseball moments.

“Back in the 80’s my family and I went to a Royals game,” Lessmann said of his favorite memory. “It turned out Brett had been injured, but he pinch hit in the ninth inning. When he came out on deck the crowd went crazy. He came up and jacked a home run over the right field wall and the stadium went wild.”

04-15-10-Hayes_Brett.jpgAn ardent Royals fan, he’s been to at least one game in K.C. each year since 1979, but growing up in Iowa also provided the chance to easily travel to games in Minnesota and Chicago. As an adult he’s taken that passion to a new level and vowed to visit every major league stadium.

“Of course, it is getting more difficult because they keep building new stadiums,” Lessmann said. Among his conquests have been the brand new Target Field, Safeco Field, Chase Field, AT&T Park, Comerica Park, Great American Ballpark and 16 others past and present.

He’s also writing on the history of baseball in his hometown of Sioux City, Iowa. And After doing some research for the book through the Library, Lessmann sought out the Hall’s Facebook page.

“The Research Center at the Hall of Fame helped me out., (so I) wanted to be a fan to show my appreciation for a great museum and research facility” he said. “I have visited the Hall of Fame a few years ago and plan to go back in the future. I went probably 10 years ago when I was in northern New York State.  My favorite memory was viewing all of the old memorabilia of Ruth, Gehrig and other greats. It is a great experience that any baseball fan should pursue.”

Now as both a Facebook fan and a Hall of Fame member, he can continue re-living the great moments in baseball history with his connection to the game. Make sure you don’t miss out on the Facebook action at www.facebook.com/baseballhall.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Frick voting under way on Facebook

Hayes_90.jpgBy Trevor Hayes

The bubbling world of social networking is getting even busier at the Hall of Fame.

The baseball season ended a month ago and we’re over 100 days away from Opening Day, but the Hall’s Facebook site started buzzing this morning and most likely will remain at a fever pitch through the end of the month.

12-01-09-Hayes_Mathews.jpgWhy? Fan voting started for the 2010 Ford C. Frick Award, which is presented annually for excellence in baseball broadcasting. The people are speaking and they are letting us know which broadcasters deserve to be honored with legends like Mel Allen, Red Barber, Vin Scully and Jack Buck. Growing up in Kansas City, 2007 Frick winner Denny Mathews provided the soundtrack to my summers. And now fans of this great game can make their voices heard on Facebook.

From now through Dec. 31, 2009 at 5 p.m. EST, fans will choose three broadcasters to be placed on the final ballot. They and seven other finalists and will be voted on in January and the 2010 honoree will be announced in February.

In order to vote, please visit the Hall of Fame Facebook page at www.facebook.com/baseballhall. Frick voting is listed under the polls tab at the top of the page. Fans must have a Facebook account and must be logged in to cast a vote, but voting is unlimited. Vote totals appearing on the site may not be current.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Follow the Weekend on Twitter!

7-22-09-Horn_Doubleday.jpgHorn_90.jpgBy Brad Horn

You can follow the entire Hall of Fame Weekend 2009 through Twitter, by following @AbnerDoubleday all weekend along  —  with updates direct from Cooperstown, New York.

I  will keep you posted on all the latest happenings, events and special moments of Induction Weekend 2009.

Joe Gordon, Rickey Henderson and Jim Rice will be enshrined as the Class of 2009 at the Baseball Hall of Fame on Sunday.

Brad Horn is the senior director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Also, don’t forget to keep up with us on Facebook and at baseballhall.org.

Turning four: Congrats Tommy and Happy Birthday MLBlogs

Hayes_90.jpgBy Trevor Hayes

This weekend we were a little busy with the sale of Hall of Fame Classic tickets and the announcement of Mike Pagliarulo’s participation in the June 21st Father’s Day Game. But we did note that Saturday was the MLBlog-osphere‘s fourth birthday; and we’d like to send a shout out to one of our own who helped start this thing.


4-20-09-Hayes_Lasorda.jpgHall of Fame manager Tommy Lasorda
wrote an introductory post on April 18, 2005, for the launch of this grand old network talking about this grand old game. Tommy has always been a great ambassador to the game (as you can see by that first post: “Remembering my friend Jackie” on Jackie Robinson). His blog has become an outlet for so many stories. As a newbie to the blog world, we here at Cooperstown Chatter are taking a page out of what he’s done and hope we can build the kind of community he has.

Today is the 41st entry for the Hall of Fame on Cooperstown Chatter and we are just over a month old, but we feel like we’re starting to connect to the vibrant community here on mlblogs.com. We have a wide variety of voices coming to you from recently retired Hall of Fame Chief Curator Ted Spencer to a special contributor Marty Appel, who made his debut last week. We’ve made a lot of progress very quickly in social networking (check out our Facebook site), and even though the Major League season is still young, we’re already chronicling the artifacts we’re collecting from the game’s historic openings, victories and defeats.

So here’s to you Tommy, and Happy Belated Birthday MLBlogs.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Face the future

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

It was 17 years ago Saturday. April 11, 1992. My first real Opening Day: the Indians’ home opener that year.

I was a writer with the Ashtabula (Ohio) Star Beacon, covering the Cleveland Indians at old Cleveland Stadium. Seven months into my first real job, I was stepping into the big leagues. Or what passed for the bigs in Cleveland.

4-6-09-Muder_Naehring.jpgI ambled up the wood stairs to the press box, squeezing my way down the hall past the Teepee Room (free hot dogs and soda). I found my seat — and found dead insects on the table in front of me. Then I hooked up my Radio Shack laptop (complete with acoustic couplers to transmit the story via the handpiece of a regular phone-line) and bounced onto the field.

Pure heaven.

It’s a little different today. Cub reporters all over the country will descend on palatial stadia like Cleveland’s Progressive Field, complete with hand-held BlackBerries capable of 100 times the output of my TRS-80 Model 100. They’ll post to live blogs, send Web updates to their sites and even tweet on Twitter.

I can imagine myself on Twitter in 1992: “Craig’s knees are knocking because he just interviewed Mark Lewis behind the batting cage.”

Today, as a part of the team at the Baseball Hall of Fame, we take a major step into the world of social media with the launch of our new Facebook page. There you can find Hall of Fame calendars and photos, along with links to our site and information about supporting our educational mission. Stop by while you’re surfing the net today on Opening Day and become a “fan” of the Hall of Fame.

By the way, the Red Sox beat the Indians in that 1992 opener, 7-5, in 19 innings on a Tim Naehring home run, and future Hall of Famer Wade Boggs was 2-for-9 with a run scored and an RBI. I didn’t get home until just before midnight — even though the game started in the early afternoon.

I don’t think I ever had as much fun.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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