Results tagged ‘ Edd Roush ’

Feller joins Club 91

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

11-2-09-Muder_Feller.jpgAt little more than four months ago, Bob Feller was standing on the mound at Doubleday Field in Cooperstown – preparing to throw the first pitch of the Baseball Hall of Fame Classic.

Today, Feller will celebrate his 91st birthday. And the man who has been a Hall of Famer longer than any other shows no signs of slowing down.

Feller, born Nov. 3, 1918, in Van Meter, Iowa, becomes the 12th Hall of Famer to reach his 91st birthday. He is the third-oldest living Hall of Famer – behind 92-year-old Lee MacPhail and 91-year-old Bobby Doerr, who is a little more than six months older than Feller

11-2-09-Muder_Chart.jpgA little perspective: Feller was born eight days before the end of World War I. And at the June 21 Hall of Fame Classic, Feller faced Hall of Famer Paul Molitor – who was born in 1956, Feller’s final year in the major leagues.

Feller, MacPhail, Doerr and Monte Irvin are the only living Hall of Famers who have reached their 90th birthday (Irvin turned 90 on Feb, 25, 2009). Stan Musial will be the next Hall of Famer to turn 90 when he celebrates his birthday on Nov. 21, 2010.

Al Lopez remains the oldest Hall of Famer, having reached the age of 97 before passing away on Oct. 30, 2005.

Feller was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1962, meaning he has lived more years as a Hall of Famer (47) than not (44). No one has worn the title of “Hall of Famer” with more pride.

Happy birthday, Bob Feller!

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Double dip: Reds and Pirates have history of multiple matchups

Berowski_90.jpgBy Freddy Berowski

On Monday, the Cincinnati Reds and Pittsburgh Pirates played a day-night doubleheader. The two games were only one game short of the record for the most games played between these teams in one day. 

Like the day that the Reds and Pirates played three, this day began with consecutive losses for the Bucs. But that’s where the similarities between this Pirates team and the 1920s squad, one that had four future Hall of Famers on its roster, end. 

9-1-09-Berowski_Traynor.jpgIt was the next to last day of the season, Oct. 2, 1920, and third place, as well as a share of the World Series receipts, was on the line. Four future Hall of Famers would compete in Major League Baseball’s last triple-header, including a little-known 21-year-old shortstop named Pie Traynor – who was 1-for-7 with a run scored and a hit by pitch in two games.  

Going into the day, the Pirates sat three and a half games behind the Reds in the standings and needed a sweep in order to have a shot at securing third place on the season’s final day.  By the end of the first game, third place was decided. The Reds’ clean-up hitter, future Hall of Famer Edd Roush, was 2-for-6 with a double in Cincinnati’s 13-4 rout of Pittsburgh. Roush would get the rest of the day off, but the Reds would still take the second game 7-3, a game in which the Reds started two pitchers in the outfield and one at first base. The Pirates won game three, a six-inning affair that was called due to darkness. The three games took exactly five hours to play. Future Hall of Famers Max Carey and Billy Southworth also saw action in the triple-header.   

Ironically, all three tripleheaders in Major League history have a Pittsburgh Pirates connection. The first one, played on Labor Day 1890, saw Brooklyn sweep Pittsburgh.  The second took place on Labor Day 1896 and saw the Baltimore Orioles sweep the Louisville Colonels, the team that would merge with the Pirates in 1900.

Freddy Berowski is a library associate at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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