Results tagged ‘ Derek Jeter ’

Hall Monitor: A Masher, A Freak, A Winner and A Legend

Hayes_90.jpgBy Trevor Hayes

Just the final weekend of the regular season remains. This season has been a long and exciting haul, but it’s not quite time for reflection with milestones still falling.


10-01-10-Hayes_RuthFoxxMantle.jpgPushing to the finish
: Toronto hitting sensation Jose Bautista hasn’t quit yet. Now with 54 homers, he collected his ninth multi-homer game of 2010 last night in Minnesota. Before this year, he had just two in his career. The Jays slugger has 15 more than the next highest American League total. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, only three players in AL history have finished with wider gaps than Bautista’s over Paul Konerko (39), and all three are Hall of Famers: Babe Ruth (six times), Jimmie Foxx and Mickey Mantle.

Giant talent in Tiny Tim: After fanning 11 on short rest Wednesday, Tim Lincecum may or may not get one more regular season start – pending the Giants’ plans. What is certain is that unless Roy Halladay pitches and reels off a 10-plus K start, the pitcher known as The Freak will win his third straight strikeout title. Beyond Halladay, no pitcher is within 15 of Lincecum. With his third consecutive title, Lincecum would join Randy Johnson and Hall of Famer Warren Spahn as the only National Leaguers to string together three straight since World War II. Furthermore, the Giants ace is doing it as a righty, something not done in the NL since another Hall of Famer, Dizzy Dean from 1932 to 1935.

10-1-10-Hayes_SpahnJohnson.jpgEvolving into quite the strikeout artist, Lincecum made his last start his 26th career game with 10 or more strikeouts. The fourth-year hurler broke a tie with Juan Marichal and now sits behind only Jason Schmidt (27) and Christy Mathewson (28) among Giants since 1900.

The Captain and the Mick: The winningest franchise in baseball has a new winningest player in team history. The Yankees own a .568 franchise winning percentage and once again employ the winningest player in team history. As of Sunday night, Derek Jeter passed Mickey Mantle for the most wins while wearing pinstripes. Mantle finished his career at 1,376 wins and Jeter, after adding one more win Tuesday, sits at 1,378 regular-season victories. Mantle still leads Jeter – 2,401 to 2,293 – for most total regular-season games.

50 Years since Ted hung ‘em up: The Red Sox plan to pay tribute to one of the legends of the game tonight at Fenway. A pre-game ceremony will mark the 50th anniversary of Ted Williams’ final game. During the bottom of the eighth on Sept. 28, 1960, he stepped to the plate and hit a home run to deep center field – the 521st of his career. In the top of the next inning, Williams trotted out to his position and then to an ovation from the Fenway faithful, was removed – never again to take the field as a major leaguer.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Scouting Hall of Famers

Gates_90.jpgBy Jim Gates

Scout units across the country will be celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Boy Scouts of America throughout the 2010 calendar year. Those of us who live in upstate New York recently saw a jamboree of more than 650 scouts, hosted by the Otschodela Council, which recognized this centenary under the leadership of Troop 1 of nearby Unadilla, N.Y.

05-25-10-Gates_BoyScouts.jpgThe National Baseball Hall of Fame has also been involved with scouting for several years, as we sponsor a special patch via the Otschodela Council which Scouts earn by completing a scavenger hunt during their visit to the Museum. Throughout the year, we see scout units from all corners of the country working on the patch, and we recently hosted a group from Troop 28 of Chatham, N.J. This unit, headed up by Scoutmaster Steve Woodall, arrived in the area on Friday evening, May 21st, and spent the night at the local scouting reservation, Camp Henderson. 

They were up bright an early on Saturday morning for a day-long visit to the Hall of Fame, and as it just so happens they found the date of their visit to coincide with our special World Series Championship weekend. Many members of this Troop are die-hard Yankees fans, and in addition to earning the patch, they had their photo taken with the 2009 New York Yankees World Series Trophy.

Troop 28 also received a behind-the-scenes tour courtesy of yours truly, who serves as a Scoutmaster for Cooperstown Troop 1254. The unit was able to learn about the archive operation, both how we take care of material and how we build the collection. As part of their visit, the boys had the chance to wear the white gloves and hold one of the bats from our collection, this one being a Derek Jeter model from 1998.

Following their day in Cooperstown, Troop 28 returned to Camp Henderson for another night of camping out, before heading to Howe Caverns on Sunday and then the drive back home to New Jersey.  We hope that this visit is one which they will all remember for many years to come. 

Scout units interested in learning more about the Hall of Fame patch are encouraged to contact the Otschodela Council.  We look forward to seeing you in Cooperstown.

Jim Gates is the librarian of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library.

Grapefruit stories

Idelson_90.jpgBy Jeff Idelson

I’m sitting in Tampa International Airport awaiting the one non-stop Southwest Airlines flight back to Albany, having just concluded my Grapefruit League spring training jaunt. My Spring Training mission each year is to visit with those who are close to the Museum – current players and management, Hall of Famers, owners and supporters.

03-24-10-Idelson_DawsonPerez.jpgHaving spent eight years combined in the Red Sox and Yankee front offices before being hired in Cooperstown in 1994, my knowledge was limited to Florida Spring Training: the Yankees were in Ft. Lauderdale and the Red Sox in Winter Haven. Since, I have traveled to the desert, too.

The differences are stark: The air is markedly drier in Arizona, because of the elevation. The ballparks in Arizona are surrounded by mountains; most of the ones in Florida, by water. Thirteen of 15 ballparks in Arizona are within 60 miles of each other. In Florida, they span across the state. I spent seven nights in one hotel in Scottsdale, Arizona; I was in six different places in six nights in Florida and flew in and out of airports across the state from each other.

The one similarity? I had a game rained out in each state.

I had a chance to visit with a number of our Hall of Famers. Andre Dawson and I had dinner in North Miami Beach, near his home. He’s already made great progress on his speech and is getting ready for Induction. “I’ll try not to get too emotional,” the stoic “Hawk” told me. I let him know that if he did not get emotional, I would be worried. Almost every speech I have heard since 1994 has been emotional. 

Hall of Fame Chairman Jane Clark, Ken Meifert from the Hall, and I, saw Mike Schmidt and his wife Donna in Palm Beach Gardens. We talked about a variety of topics, from baseball to bull riding to music to living in Florida. Mike is very excited about our inaugural Hall of Fame Classic Golf tournament in June, in which he will participate. He was thrilled to know that a number of the 28 spots available are already filled.

03-24-10-Idelson_Jupiter.jpgLast Saturday, we hosted our Hall of Fame Champions in Jupiter. John and Kathy Greenthal became the first Champions in Hall of Fame history to attend events in both Spring Training states. Jim and Tina Collias made the trip over from Naples to Jupiter, and Dan Glazer also joined us. Hall of Fame Board member Bill DeWitt, owner of the Cardinals, was generous in hosting us for his team’s game with the Mets. Spring Training games are usually not that interesting, but this one featured the Mets scoring three runs in the 9th, the last on an Ike Davis game-tying home run, only to have Ruben Gotay lead off the bottom of the 9th with a walk-off home run.

Speaking of walk-off home runs, we dined with Dennis and Jennifer Eckersley after the game. I asked Dennis what he thought of Doug Harvey. “He was behind the plate for Kirk Gibson’s home run in the 1988 World Series,” Dennis reminded me, as I began to suffer the symptoms of foot-in-mouth disease. He still thought Harvey was an excellent arbiter. 

I headed across the state to Yankee camp and saw many old friends in the clubhouse before the game: Billy Connors, Ron Guidry, Goose Gossage, Steve Donohue, the team athletic trainer, Joe Girardi, Mariano Rivera and Derek Jeter, whom we drafted when I worked for the team. The game was rained out as Gene Michael, his minor league teammate and Tigers broadcaster, Jim Price, and I had lunch. Also saw Tiger friends Dave Dombrowski and Al Aliva in the dining room and learned more about the Tigers.

Dinner that night was with Wade and Debbie Boggs and Reggie Jackson. Eddie Fastook, the team’s traveling security director and a long-time friend, also joined us. 

Unbeknownst to me, Boggs grew up a big Reggie Jackson fan, even wearing No. 9 in honor, the number Reggie wore early in his career in Oakland. Wade told the story of how in the mid 1980s, Reggie gave him one of his bats to use in 1985. “I used it for 33 straight games and hit five home runs,” said Wade. “I loved that bat and then I broke it on a Dave Stieb pitch,” a dejected Wade recalled.

03-24-10-Idelson_Zimmer.jpgThe next morning, I visited City of Palms Park in Fort Myers to see the Red Sox and the Rays. I met up with Don Zimmer, who is very bullish on the Rays this year. “The best club we’ve had in my seven years with them,” Zim said.

Zim told me how much he admired Dawson and Ryne Sandberg when he managed the Cubs. “Two guys who led by example,” he said. “The other players watched these guys and saw greatness in the making.”

I told Don I would be seeing Jim Rice and Bob Montgomery later that day. 

“Monty was the best hit-and-run guy I ever had,” recalled Zim. “I remember in a game with Cleveland, the bases were loaded. They had a sinker-baller on the mound so I rolled the dice and gave (coach) Eddie Yost the hit-and-run sign on a 3-2 count. Monty put the bat on the ball and we stayed out of the double play. Everyone looked at me like I was crazy, but I really thought it would work, and it did.”

Rice later told me that he believed Thurman Munson and Lou Piniella were among the best hit-and-run guys he saw when he played.

I concluded my trip with dinner at Carlton and Linda Fisk’s home in the Sarasota area. We had a wonderful visit and a great dinner. Pudge joked about how some of the evenings in Florida this year were as cold as those he experienced growing up in New Hampshire.

I’ve had my fill. Let the regular season begin.

Jeff Idelson is president of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

A marriage in baseball heaven

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

Sometimes their neighbors get confused when they fly both a Yankees and Red Sox flag at their house, but it seems to work for Rich Kretser and Alison Moorby.

11-13-09-Carr_WeddingCouple.jpgThey even wore their opposing fan gear on Friday when they arrived in Cooperstown to do a walk through for their wedding – appropriately being held at the Baseball Hall of Fame on Saturday.

“We are huge baseball fans and members so it just made sense to have it here,” said Moorby. “We started dating in 2004 and our first date was a Yankees-Red Sox game. Our whole relationship revolves around baseball and it is what we love to do together.”

Kretser and Morrby live in Canajoharie, NY, about a 40 minute car ride northeast of Cooperstown. They emailed the Hall of Fame in April to see if it was possible to get married here.

“We are having about 50 guests and wanted a small place,” said Moorby.

“Once we knew we could have it here, there was no question,” added Kretser.

Kretser works for Pepsi and Moorby for Price Chopper and after meeting at work, a friend passed his number along to her.

“We were kind of on opposite sides at work and sometimes I would even avoid her. But when she called me up and asked me to a Yankees-Red Sox game, I wasn’t going to say no,” he said.

11-13-09-Carr_GrandstandTheater.jpgThe game turned out to be a memorable one, for more than one reason.

“It was the best first date I’ve ever had. It was the game when Derek Jeter dove into the stands and came out with a bloody face. We had plenty of time to talk,” said Moorby.

“And the Yankees won in 14 innings,” adds Kretser.

Although Kretser could spend some time gloating on the way home, it has been Moorby who has done most of the celebrating in the playoffs during their relationship.

“It can get a little tense sometimes in the playoffs, but we bond because we are baseball fans in general,” said Kretser.

This weekend, the happy couple will have something besides baseball to celebrate. Kretser, fresh of his team’s 27th World Series win, has already requested a gift from his new wife.

“That’s right, we have to pick up a new Yankees flag while we’re here.”

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Gift of gloves

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

10-1-09-Carr_Jeter.jpgFirst Cal Ripken broke Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig‘s “unbreakable” record of consecutive games played. Now, Derek Jeter has passed him for the lead on the all-time Yankees hit list.

It only seems fitting that Gehrig’s records have been broken by players who are respected for their character almost as much as he was.

Gehrig’s hit record lasted seven decades despite having his career cut short because of a battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease that would claim his life and later bear his name. Gehrig retired at age 35 in 1939.

“Lou Gehrig, being a former captain and what he stood for, you mention his name to any baseball fan around the country, it means a lot,” Jeter said. “I think passing him makes it stand out that much more.”

Jeter donated his batting gloves from the historic game on Sept. 11 – when he recorded his 2,722nd hit as a Yankee – to the Baseball Hall of Fame, and they are currently being accessioned into the Museum. The Yankees captain has four World Series rings, 10 All-Star Game selections and three Gold Gloves during his 15 seasons in the Bronx.

10-1-09-Carr_JeterHit.jpgHe has six seasons of 200-plus hits and ranks 49th on the all-time hit list. At age 35 and healthy, Jeter has a good chance to add to that number and continue making history. He currently sits No. 1 in franchise history in at-bats (8,593), second in stolen bases (300), third in games played (2,136), fourth in runs scored (1,574) and doubles (438) and fifth in career batting average (.317).

Of the 30 major league teams, over half have Hall of Famers for their all-time hits leader. The list includes players like Ty Cobb, Hank Aaron and Stan Musial.

Gehrig may no longer top the Yankees list, but his legacy in pinstripes will not soon be forgotten. The Baseball Hall of Fame will honor Gehrig, Roberto Clemente and Jackie Robinson during Character and Courage Weekend Oct. 10-12 in Cooperstown.

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

History comes alive

Hayes_90.jpgBy Trevor Hayes

Several of today’s stars continued to carve out a bit of history for themselves this week alongside some notable Hall of Famers.
 

9-11-09-Hayes_MusialRoberts.jpgDoubled-Up:
With double No. 50 Wednesday, Brian Roberts became the fourth player with three or more 50-double seasons. Hall of Famers Stan Musial and Paul Waner each did it three times while Hall of Famer Tris Speaker did it five times. Including his 51 last season, Roberts has put together his second straight 50-double season, putting him in an elite club with nine players – including three Hall of Famers: Speaker, Joe Medwick and Billy Herman.

On the subject of doubles, the same night Roberts got 50, the Royals Billy Butler hit three doubles in a game for fourth time this season. According to the Elias Sports Bureau, Butler’s binge is unprecedented. No player has had four three-double games in a season dating back to 1901.

Quick Hit: A lot has been written about Derek Jeter tying Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig on the Yankees hits list. But one note that might slip by is that Jeter is now the fourth active player to hold his franchise’s all-time hits mark. Ivan Rodriguez returned to Texas earlier this season, where he has the most hits in Senators/Rangers club history. The other two all-time franchise leaders for the team they currently play for are Colorado’s Todd Helton and Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford.
 
Doc and the Babe: The Yankees might not like Roy Halladay very much. Most recently he stopped their seven-game winning streak with a one-hitter, but the Blue Jays’ ace has always been tough against the Bombers. He holds a .739 winning percentage against the Yankees with a 17-6 record. The only man better than him (min. 20 decisions) made his name as a hitter in New York. However, as a pitcher in Boston, future Hall of Famer Babe Ruth went 17-5 (.773) against his eventual team.
 
9-11-09-Hayes_McCoy.jpgSlugging shortstops: Hanley Ramirez connected for the 100th home run of his career on Sunday, making him the fourth-fastest shortstop to reach the century mark. At 595 games, only Alex Rodriguez (470 games), Nomar Garciaparra (491) and Hall of Famer Ernie Banks (500) got there faster.

Goodbye to the Real McCoy: Longtime Reds beat writer Hal McCoy will be honored Wednesday prior to Cincinnati’s game against the Astros. The 2002 J.G. Taylor Spink winner announced earlier this season he will be retiring after 37 years covering the Reds. As a special treat, McCoy’s paper, Dayton Daily News, is sponsoring half-price tickets to the game.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Jeter making more history

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

8-20-09-Carr_AparicioJeter.jpgWith an RBI double in the third inning of Sunday’s game against the Mariners, Derek Jeter passed Hall of Famer Luis Aparicio for the most hits by a shortstop. And at just 35 years old, Jeter is far from finished.

“I think I have a few more hits left in me,” Jeter said.

Through Wednesday’s game, Jeter needs only 25 hits in the Yankees’ last 41 contests to pass Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig and become the Yankees’ all-time hit leader. He already holds the Yankees record for career singles.

Offensively, Jeter’s numbers are similar to many Hall of Fame shortstops, including Cal Ripken Jr. The numbers below reflect games played at shortstop:

8-20-09-Carr_RipkenJeterChart.jpgLuke Appling and Joe Cronin, two other Hall of Fame shortstops who played almost all of their games at short, had similar career numbers to that of Ripken and Jeter. Here are their career lines, counting games they played at other positions:

 
8-20-09-Carr_ApplingCroninChart.jpg
8-20-09-Carr_ApplingCroninRipken.jpgJeter has won three Gold Glove Awards, two Silver Slugger Awards and the 1996 AL Rookie of the Year Award. In 2000, he was the MVP of the All-Star Game and the World Series. He has four World Series rings and has been named to nine All-Star Games, including starting the 2008 game at Yankee Stadium. In 2003, he was named the 11th Yankee captain.

Like all these players, Jeter has shown one attribute in his career that has allowed him to put up impressive offensive numbers – consistency.

“I think being consistent is something that gets overlooked at times, but I think every player strives to be consistent,” Jeter said. “That’s all you can do.”

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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