Results tagged ‘ Cal Ripken ’

Carter was truly an All-Star

By Craig Muder

It was the summer of my discontent, when baseball stopped.

For almost two months in 1981, I slept on the couch in our den – seemingly uprooted from my bed due to the cataclysmic work stoppage that rocked the National Pastime. I woke up each day and flipped on the TV (we had no access to ESPN back then, so it was the national networks) to see if the strike had ended.

Finally, on July 31, it was over. The season would resume after 713 games were canceled. And it would start with the All-Star Game in Cleveland.

On August 9, baseball returned before 72,086 fans at Cleveland Stadium. Gary Carter was the hero.

Carter’s two solo home runs – one in the fifth that tied the game at one and another in the seventh that cut the American League’s lead to 4-3 – helped the National League prevail 5-4.

More importantly, it showed that baseball was stronger than any work stoppage.

I cheered for Gary Carter that day and his performance was rewarded with the All-Star Game MVP Award.

That season Carter’s Expos made their lone playoff appearance, thanks in large part to the Kid. Three years later, during one of the best seasons of his career – hitting .294 with 27 homers and a league leading 106 RBIs – Carter would again earn the All-Star Game MVP Award with another key home run.

To date, Carter is one of four players to receive the honor, joining Willie Mays, Steve Garvey and Cal Ripken.

He made baseball a better game – and the world a better place. He will be missed.

Craig Muder is the director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

10 Years After: Remembering 9-11

By Jeff Idelson

On the morning of September 11, 2001, I woke up to beautiful late summer/early fall conditions.  Warm temperatures and a good-looking day.

After my morning run and breakfast, I headed to the office to pick up a few things before leaving for Albany International Airport. I was on my way to Baltimore to see Cal Ripken, who was planning to retire at season’s end.

The purpose of the meeting was to determine what artifacts Cal would consider sending to the Hall of Fame, once the season ended, as well as how they would be presented to us. Would it be at the ballpark? Quietly, or in a ceremony? The day of the final game or some other time?

Cal had a long history of presenting historic artifacts to the Museum, so we knew he understood the enormity of his career concluding, and how we would recognize this sure-fire, first-ballot future Hall of Famer in Cooperstown.

I left the Hall of Fame at 8:30 am for an 11 a.m. flight on Southwest Airlines. From there, I planned to make my way to Cal’s hometown, Aberdeen, Md., for a lunch-time meeting with Cal and Orioles PR chief John Maroon. We had arranged the meeting a few weeks prior, and picked September 11 because it was an off-day for the Orioles, who returned home on a redeye from Seattle after playing on the 10th.

As I left Cooperstown that morning, I tuned the radio dial to the 50,000-watt news station out of Albany, WGY Radio. I was about 40 miles north and west of Cooperstown when I heard about the planes hitting the World Trade Center and then the Pentagon. Without the benefit of owning a cell phone at the time and without access to a television, I listened in amazement, not realizing the enormity of what was happening.

Then the report came that all airports were closed. I was already really nervous and frightened hearing about the plane crashes and when it was reported that all airports were closed, I was more than happy to turn around, which I had been contemplating anyhow. When I returned to the Hall of Fame and put on the television, I realized the severity of what had happened.

We ended up having the meeting by telephone a few weeks later. I went to Baltimore for Cal’s final game. Afterward at the press conference, he took off his jersey and handed it to me along with his glove, with his kids by his side. I flew home to Cooperstown with the artifacts the next morning, where they were put on exhibit as a remembrance of Cal’s indelible career, and – to me – as a reminder of a tragic day in American history.

Jeff Idelson is the President of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Gift of gloves

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

10-1-09-Carr_Jeter.jpgFirst Cal Ripken broke Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig‘s “unbreakable” record of consecutive games played. Now, Derek Jeter has passed him for the lead on the all-time Yankees hit list.

It only seems fitting that Gehrig’s records have been broken by players who are respected for their character almost as much as he was.

Gehrig’s hit record lasted seven decades despite having his career cut short because of a battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a disease that would claim his life and later bear his name. Gehrig retired at age 35 in 1939.

“Lou Gehrig, being a former captain and what he stood for, you mention his name to any baseball fan around the country, it means a lot,” Jeter said. “I think passing him makes it stand out that much more.”

Jeter donated his batting gloves from the historic game on Sept. 11 – when he recorded his 2,722nd hit as a Yankee – to the Baseball Hall of Fame, and they are currently being accessioned into the Museum. The Yankees captain has four World Series rings, 10 All-Star Game selections and three Gold Gloves during his 15 seasons in the Bronx.

10-1-09-Carr_JeterHit.jpgHe has six seasons of 200-plus hits and ranks 49th on the all-time hit list. At age 35 and healthy, Jeter has a good chance to add to that number and continue making history. He currently sits No. 1 in franchise history in at-bats (8,593), second in stolen bases (300), third in games played (2,136), fourth in runs scored (1,574) and doubles (438) and fifth in career batting average (.317).

Of the 30 major league teams, over half have Hall of Famers for their all-time hits leader. The list includes players like Ty Cobb, Hank Aaron and Stan Musial.

Gehrig may no longer top the Yankees list, but his legacy in pinstripes will not soon be forgotten. The Baseball Hall of Fame will honor Gehrig, Roberto Clemente and Jackie Robinson during Character and Courage Weekend Oct. 10-12 in Cooperstown.

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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