Results tagged ‘ Brooks Robinson ’

Getting Excited for the Classic

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

I work at the Baseball Hall of Fame and am surrounded by some of the greatest baseball minds and scholars in the world on a daily basis. But the other night when I was watching a ballgame on TV and had a question, I still picked up the phone and called my dad.

The bond we have was only strengthened over the years as my father coached me in Little League, just as he had my brother and sister before me. He never missed a game in high school or college and was always there to give me advice on my swing. Although my playing days are behind me, my dad is still always there for me to fix my computer or find out why my car is making that funny noise. Now that all of his kids are coaches, you can still find him at the diamond, showing his support and sharing tips.

6-11-09-Carr_Classic.jpgBaseball runs in my family. My dad’s father loved the game and his older brother does too. My dad passed that love on to us. This Father’s Day, my family is coming to Cooperstown to celebrate Dad and watch some legends of my childhood, and his, compete at Doubleday Field.

We are excited to watch Phil Niekro dazzle hitters again with his knuckleball, and see Bob Feller prove that at 90 years old, he’s still got it. Not to mention the chance to meet Brooks Robinson, Fergie Jenkins and Paul Molitor. It will be fun to see a few players who just recently retired like Jeff Kent, Mike Timlin and Steve Finley – and I know my dad will be happy to see some Yankee greats like Mike Pagliarulo and Kevin Maas.

People are always in awe of my job because I get to work in baseball and meet some legendary players. But June 21st will be pretty special this year – because I get to share it all with my dad.

For tickets to the June 21 Hall of Fame Classic, call 1-888-Hall-of-Fame weekdays between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Championing the Classic

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

At 49, Mike Pagliarulo almost blends in with the crowd.

Wearing blue jeans and sneakers, the former big league third baseman strolled into Cooper Park next to the Baseball Hall of Fame on Saturday and drew little attention. But quickly, the fans in the ticket line for the Hall of Fame Classic noticed it: The World Series ring Pagliarulo won in 1991 as as a member of the Minnesota Twins.

 
4-18-09-Muder_Pags.jpgAnd suddenly, the buzz started.

Pagliarulo, who spent 11 seasons in the major leagues with the Yankees, Padres, Twins, Orioles and Rangers, visited the Hall of Fame on Saturday in advance of the June 21 Hall of Fame Classic. Pagliarulo will play third base during the Classic as well as sign autographs and share memories from his big league career.

On Saturday, he thrilled fans with his homespun advice and easy-going style.

Really, what I’m most proud about my big league career is that it allowed me to put my kids through college,” Pagliarulo said. “But when you come (to Cooperstown), you think about all the game gave to you. That’s why this is such a special place.”

After visiting with fans in the ticket line, Pagliarulo entertained more than 100 Museum fans in a 30-minute question-and-answer session. Ironically, his biggest baseball thrill came not on the field — but at the Yankees’ Old Timers Day 24 years ago.

I walked into the locker room, and Joe DiMaggio was at my locker. And he just started talking to me,” Pagliarulo said. “Then, Billy Martin and Mickey Mantle came in — and Mickey gets me in a headlock and drags me into the trainers room. God forbid I hit him back! That’s Mickey Mantle!
 
“I don’t remember anything on the field that day. But I remember the time in the clubhouse.”

Pagliarulo will join Hall of Famers Fergie Jenkins, Paul Molitor, Phil Niekro and Brooks Robinson at the June 21 Classic — along with about 20 other former major leaguers, including George Foster, Jim Kaat, Bill Lee, Steve Rogers and Lee Smith. More participants will be announced at www.baseballhall.org next week.

For ticket information, call 1-866-849-7770 or visit www.baseballhall.org.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Card Counting

Gates_90.jpg
By Jim Gates

Alvin Toffler’s Future Shock was published in 1970. A noted sociologist and futurist, Toffler presented a thesis which argued that our society was faced with an accelerated rate of technological and cultural upheaval that would lead to increases in stress and disorientation. These symptoms were described as future shock, basically stemming from one’s existence in a world where there was an overwhelming number of choices which had to be made with ever-increasing frequency.

4-2-09-Gates_Cards.jpgLittle did I realize that Toffler’s theories might be applicable to the world of baseball cards, but a review of the current collecting world indicates his work might be relevant. Using one of my new favorite Web sites, openchecklist.com, I have reviewed the number of cards produced for some high-caliber players and learned the following:

  • Willie Mays played from 1951-73, and during his career there were 196 Mays baseball cards produced, or 8.5 per year. Since his career ended, another 514 cards have been produced, leading to a total of 710 cards.
  • Brooks Robinson played from 1955-77, and during his career there were 186 cards produced, or 8.1 per season. Since his career ended, another 661 cards appeared, leading to a grand total of 847 cards.
  • Greg Maddux began his career in 1986 and just recently announced his retirement. Although Open Checklist only lists his cards through 2005, 4,279 have been produced, or 213.9 per season.
  • Ichiro Suzuki first played in the Major Leagues in 2001, and his checklist is only available through 2004, but he has appeared on 2,024 cards, not counting the 141 cards from his years in Japan. This amounts to an average of 506 cards per year.

What does this mean? Well, when I was a youngster and engaged in card collecting, it was quite possible to collect a full set of cards of my favorite player, team, or even a particular series of cards. However, today’s young fans don’t seem to stand a chance! The abundance of cards for any particular star is simply overwhelming. Toffler also coined the term “information overload,” and this certainly applies to the universe of baseball cards.

Jim Gates is librarian of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library.

A second Brooks glove in Cooperstown

By John Odell

Brooks Robinson was known for his work with the leather. His play at the hot corner set a standard to which all third basemen are compared. His uncanny ability to pick up ground balls also led to comparisons to a vacuum cleaner.

3-25-09-Odell_BRobinsonGlove.jpgWe just installed a new acquisition: Robinson’s 1966 glove, recently donated by the family of a fan of both Brooks and the Hall of Fame.

1966 was a great year for Orioles named Robinson. While Frank enjoyed his trade to the Birds by winning the Triple Crown and the American League Most Valuable Player Award, Brooks was the All-Star Game MVP, finished second in the season’s AL MVP tally and won the seventh of his 16 consecutive Gold Glove Awards. Together they led the O’s to the world championship.

This is the second of Robinson’s gloves in our collection. The glove he wore while winning the 1970 World Series MVP Award had long been a popular artifact in the Museum, but it only recently returned from a six-year tour of the country as part of Baseball As America, seen by 2.5 million visitors in 15 cities. That glove was then added to the Museum’s World Series exhibit, Autumn Glory.

John Odell is the curator of history and research at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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