Results tagged ‘ Autumn Glory ’

‘Giant’ Fall Classic Celebration

By Trevor Hayes

The World Series Trophy’s annual trip to Upstate New York continues until the Hall of Fame closes on Sunday at 5 p.m.

Like past champs, The 2010 World Champion Giants are having their day(s) in Cooperstown with special events, guided tours and a public viewing of the 2010 World Series Trophy in the Library Atrium.

It’s been a unique celebration so far as fans throughout the day have taken advantage of their chance to brush with history. Earlier today, Museum visitors got a special treat as the Hall connected with San Francisco live for a tour of AT&T Park and a lesson in Giants history via videoconference.

Among programs that are being offered all weekend are guided tours through the Hall of Fame, focused on the 129-year history of the New York/San Francisco Giants. The tours start at the Museum Membership Services Desk and begin at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.

Also still being offered is a chance to test your knowledge of one of baseball’s oldest teams by answering trivia questions in Giants Jeopardy. That event will be offered at noon Sunday in the Bullpen Theater.

The other big event tomorrow are a pair Giants-centric Artifact Spotlights at 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. in The Learning Center, allowing visitors a chance to see up close, artifacts not currently on display in the Hall and hear the story behind the historic items.

To cap off the Giants Celebration, visitors should also seek out Autumn Glory to see the exhibit displaying key items from the Giants 2010 Championship run. Included in the exhibit are Series MVP Edgar Renteria’s bat from his game-winning home run in Game 5, staff ace and two-game World Series winner Tim Lincecum’s Game 5 road jersey, Rookie of the Year Buster Posey’s catcher’s mask and spikes and much more.

All programs and activities are included with Museum admission, so for fans looking to get even more close than usual to history, the can by snapping their pictures with baseball’s iconic trophy in the Home of Baseball.

Trevor Hayes is the editorial production manager at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Era ends, but history lives

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

For baseball fans born between 1960 and 1980, his story was the first you committed to memory.

“The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant!”

On Monday, that story ended with the death of Bobby Thomson. But the legend lives forever.

08-17-10_Muder_ThomsonB.jpgI can still see the pages of my dog-eared copy of the David S. Neft & Richard M. Cohen World Series encyclopedia. A Christmas gift from my parents in 1979, it provided my first taste of the baseball statistics that would one day fill my mind. In that book, each Fall Classic from 1903 through 1978 is preserved – along with season stats from the two Series teams.

But as a bonus, Neft & Cohen provided box scores and play-by-play of season tiebreakers, including the most famous of them all: The 1951 three-game classic between the Giants and the Dodgers.

It was like finding a dollar in the couch cushions – something extra to be devoured. I poured through those box scores over and over, dreaming of becoming Thomson while agonizing over the fate of Ralph Branca.

No matter what the future holds for baseball, the past will always remain king. That time, that city, that moment, that comeback… It was all too perfect – a scene never to be repeated.

The Autumn Glory exhibit at the Baseball Hall of Fame serves as a monument to Thomson’s pennant-winning homer with an exhibit dedicated to the Oct. 3, 1951 Shot Heard ‘Round the World. Thomson’s bat, cap and spikes from that day are on display, as well as a rosin bag used by Branca. They serve as a reminder of the greatest homer ever struck in major league competition.

The Museum’s Library also contains a copy of that Neft & Cohen chronology, a book that started so many on the path to baseball adoration.

In so many ways, that path began with a home run by Bobby Thomson.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Going Gonzo for Cooperstown

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

Winning a World Series is the goal of every major league player from the time they enter the big leagues. Luis Gonzalez not only has a ring, but helped his team in dramatic fashion with a walk-off hit in Game 7 of the 2001 World Series against the premier closer of his generation, the Yankees’ Mariano Rivera.

 
07-28-10-Carr-GonzalezLuis.jpgThe 2001 World Series was special because it was the Diamondbacks’ first and the first ever to be played in Arizona – but more so because it came two months after the September 11th attacks.

“There was so much going on in the world at that time that baseball was a release for people. Especially being played in New York where the attacks took place. They could forget about all the trouble and enjoy America’s Pastime,” said Gonzalez, who is in Cooperstown this week coaching his son Jacob’s travel team at Cooperstown Dreams Park.

“Gonzo” donated the bat he used from that 2001 game to the Hall of Fame, and it is on display in the Autumn Glory exhibit on the third floor of the Museum.

“It was dramatic, in Game 7 and definitely a memorable World Series,” he said.

Gonzalez’s team is 5-1 so far this week – and the players visited the Museum on Wednesday after meeting Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson, who gave them a sneak peak at one of the newest Hall acquisitions – the cap Arizona’s Edwin Jackson wore during his June 25 no-hitter.

Gonzalez retired in 2009, and he will have his number retired by the Diamondbacks on Aug. 7 – the first player to receive that honor.

“I’ve been enjoying my time coaching my son and taking the team to Cooperstown,” Gonzalez said. “It is great to take them through the Museum so they can dream – just as I did as a kid.”

Gonzalez will be eligible for Hall of Fame election in 2014 and with five All-Star appearances, 354 home runs, 596 doubles (15th on the all-time list) and a lifetime .283 batting average over 19 seasons he is likely to get some consideration.

“The Hall of Fame is every kid’s dream when you start playing baseball,” said Gonzalez. “You just hope that I did as much as I could in the game, that I helped with community service and that I did enough on and off the field.”

Samantha Carr is the manager of web and digital media for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Cooperstown sporting an Empire State of Mind

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

There’s something almost regal about it.

The white jersey, the navy pinstripes. The distinctive “NY” below the left shoulder that could almost be an unofficial World Series logo.

The New York Yankees have come home to Cooperstown.

11-19-09-Muder_Artifacts.jpgThe National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum opened the new Autumn Glory exhibit today, featuring more than a dozen artifacts from the 2009 postseason. Treasures from the Yankees’ 27th World Series title highlight the display, which features items such as the spikes Johnny Damon wore during his double steal in Game 4 of the World Series; the bat used by World Series Most Valuable Player Hideki Matsui in Game 6 of the Series; and tickets from all six World Series games.

Front-and-center, however, is the jersey Andy Pettitte wore when he won Game 6 of the American League Championship Series. With that win, Pettitte not only became the all-time postseason victory leader with 16 wins but also put the Yankees in the World Series for the first time in six seasons.

Phillies artifacts are also featured in Autumn Glory, including Cliff Lee’s postseason cap. The artifacts will remain on display through the 2010 postseason as the Museum celebrates all the achievements of 2009.

After eight World Series without a Yankees championship, New Yorkers – and Yankee fans everywhere – are once again front-and-center in Cooperstown.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Phillies fans celebrate World Series title in Cooperstown

Muder_90.jpgBy Craig Muder

6-27-09-Muder_Ring.jpgLarry Shenk has seen his share of fanatic Phillies fans. But Shenk, the longtime head of the Phillies communications department and now a team vice president, couldn’t help but be impressed with the turnout on Saturday in Cooperstown.

“It’s great to look out and see all that Phillies red,” said Shenk, who was in Cooperstown on Saturday to present a 2008 World Series ring to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. “It was eight months ago today, Oct. 27, when the Phillies clinched the World Series title. And we’d like to come back and do this again next year.”

6-27-09-Muder_Trophy.jpgThe overflow crowd in the Museum’s Autumn Glory exhibit cheered Shenk’s proclamation, then took turns taking pictures of the ring Shenk presented to Hall of Fame Senior Vice President Bill Haase. The ring will become part of the Museum’s collection and will soon be displayed in the Museum’s Autumn Glory exhibit, which is dedicated to baseball’s postseason.

After the presentation, Shenk and his wife Julie — who wore her World Series pendant, given to player’s and executive’s wives — walked down to see the 2008 World Series trophy, which is on display at the Hall of Fame through Sunday, June 28.

“This is the 10th state we’ve brought the trophy to since we won it,” Shenk said. “But it’s the first time we’ve had it in New York. I think it was safer to bring it to Cooperstown, New York, than Flushing, New York — with all those Mets fans there.”

Museum visitors can view the 2008 World Series trophy until 5 p.m. on Saturday and then from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The chance to see the World Series trophy is included with regular Museum admission.

Craig Muder is director of communications for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.
6-27-09-Muder_Crowd.jpg

Hall of a game for Crawford

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

After winning the American League pennant last year and starting off slow in 2009, the Rays were starting to be regarded as a fluke by some baseball fans. But Tampa Bay’s Carl Crawford proved Sunday — by tying the record of a Hall of Famer — that the Rays are heating up again.

Tampa Bay took three of four from the second-place Red Sox over the weekend and is 11-2 against Boston at Tropicana Field dating back to last year. The Rays have a Major League-leading 40 stolen bases through 26 games. On Sunday, the Rays tore up the basepaths by stealing a club-record eight bases. Crawford swiped six in six tries.

“Hopefully, it’s the start of something,” Crawford told MLB.com. “We have to pick it up if we want to get to where we were at last year, so hopefully, it was the start of something.”

5-4-09-Carr_Crawford.jpgCrawford graciously donated his jersey from the 2008 World Series, and the jersey is currently on display in the Hall of Fame’s Autumn Glory exhibit. Crawford has agreed to donate his spikes from Sunday’s game to the Hall of Fame.

Crawford reached base in each of his five plate appearances Sunday, four times on hits, and tied the modern-day Major League record of six stolen bases held by Hall of Famer Eddie Collins in the American League and Otis Nixon and Eric Young in the National League. It was the first time a player recorded six steals and four hits in one game since Collins did it in 1912.

Crawford leads the Majors with 17 stolen bases, four more than Jacoby Ellsbury of the Red Sox. He has yet to be thrown out this season and is only one successful steal away from becoming the American League’s all-time leader in stolen-base percentage for players with at least 300 steals. Crawford is at 83.28 percent, and Willie Wilson is the record-holder with 83.29. Hall of Famer Paul Molitor holds the American League record for most steals in a season without getting caught with 20.

If Crawford continues his larceny for a few more years, he might just run himself all the way to Cooperstown. Of the top 10 base stealers in the modern era, seven are enshrined in Cooperstown.

Top 10 Modern-Era Base Stealers
Rickey Henderson* 1,406
Lou Brock* 938
Ty Cobb* 892
Tim Raines 808
Vince Coleman 752
Eddie Collins* 744
Max Carey* 738
Honus Wagner* 722
Joe Morgan* 689
Willie Wilson 668
* – denotes Hall of Famer

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

An Unforgettable Birthday at the Museum

Carr_90.jpgBy Samantha Carr

Donald Bentzel had no idea what to expect when the limo arrived at his home Thursday morning. All he knew was that it was his 60th birthday, and the boys had planned a trip.

“I had no idea. I thought we were on our way to an old-folks home to dump me off,” Bentzel said, laughing.

4-2-09-Carr_Bentzels.jpgInstead, Troy, Tim and Brian had planned him a trip to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Donald’s wife, Roxanne, began to drop hints about one hour into the trip from Ephrata, Pa., and four hours later, they arrived in Cooperstown.

“How many years have we waited to come here?” Roxanne asked her husband.

“I can’t believe I’m here,” Bentzel said.

The entire family is either active in or retired from the U.S. Army and Air Force. Tim was able to take leave and join his parents on the trip, but Troy and Brian are stationed in Alabama and Georgia and were unable to make the trip.

Bentzel coached Midget League baseball for nine years in the ’80s, and Roxanne describes him as a true sports fanatic.

“I have always wanted to come,” said Bentzel, proudly wearing his Phillies shirt.

And he can’t wait to see the Autumn Glory exhibit featuring the Phillies’ World Series artifacts. He loved every minute of the championship run last October, and he and the boys ran up their cell-phone bills calling back and forth.

Donald had expected Cooperstown to just be a big tourist attraction. But once he got here, he realized it is much more than that.

“It’s baseball. It takes me back to the ’40s, ’50s and ’60s when baseball was every kid’s fantasy. It’s the atmosphere. I can hear the called third-strike, the sound of the bat hitting a ball, and Cy Young is walking beside me, and I’m telling him how to hold his fastball.”

With the Hall of Famers as guests, this will be a birthday party that Bentzel and his family won’t soon forget.

Samantha Carr is the media relations coordinator at the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

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